Utility Division (Water & Sewer)

Overview

 
The Utility division maintains, operates, and repairs the Village's sanitary, storm water and drinking water distribution systems. This responsibility includes infrastructure elements such as street drain inlets, catch basins, sewer and water mains, manholes, lift stations, pump stations, flood issues, sewer-back-ups, water main breaks, water sampling, buffalo boxes, water meters, and fire hydrants.

Water Billing


For billing questions and concerns, contact the Utility Billing/Collection Coordinator at (847) 499-9016. 

Water Quality or Pressure


The Utility division maintains, operates, and repairs the Village's sanitary, storm water and drinking water distribution systems. This responsibility includes infrastructure elements such as street drain inlets, catch basins, sewer and water mains, manholes, lift stations, pump stations, flood issues, sewer-back-ups, water main breaks, water sampling, buffalo boxes, water meters, and fire hydrants.

Cross-Connections


Residents and commercial properties must have any existing backflow prevention devices inspected on an annual basis. BSI is a contractor hired by the Village to oversee inspections and all test results. For more information, contact Community Development at (847) 459-2620.

Please click here for further cross-connection information.

Sewer Back-Up


If you are experiencing a sewer-backup, contact Public Works immediately. For calls after-hours, contact Police Dispatch at (847) 459-2632. Once notified, Public Works will inspect the local sanitary sewer main and resolve the problem if one exists in the pipe. If the problem exists in the connecting private sewer line, it will become necessary for the property owner make the repairs or hire a licensed plumber. A private sewer line is typically the pipe that extends from a building to the public sewer main connection.

Storm Water Pollution


Storm water pollution is a challenging water quality concern. Storm water is excess rain or snowmelt, referred to as “runoff”, which occurs and accumulates above or below ground after a rainfall or snow event. Impervious surfaces such as driveways and streets prevent storm water from naturally soaking into the ground, and instead the water eventually flows into creeks, rivers and lakes carrying with it pollutants such as litter, lawn and vehicle chemicals, and animal waste. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that at least 50% of the nation’s water pollution is caused by runoff.

Residents and business owners can directly reduce storm water pollution by controlling our actions and limiting introduction of contaminants that originate through: 
  • Illegal dumping into the sewer system of antifreeze, motor oil, solvents, and paints.
  • Pesticides and fertilizers.
  • Pet waste.
  • Sediment from construction sites.
  • Oil and grease from roadways.
  • Carelessly discarded trash/litter, including cigarette butts.
Once deposited into the watershed, these pollutants can negatively impact the recreational and essential use of a natural resource by contaminating the groundwater supply and interfering with the wildlife habitat of fish and other animals. 

Residents and business owners can prevent water pollution by collecting unnecessary debris and pet waste, using pesticides and fertilizers sparingly, recycling hazardous chemical waste, reducing vehicle leaks, and using chemicals such as those for pools, at established guidelines. 

Water quality or water pollution issues can be reported to the Department of Public Works at
(847) 279-6900.
 

Water Main Breaks


If residents see water coming up from the ground, or notice an unusual amount of water in a normally dry area, it may indicate a water main break. If this occurs, contact Public Works immediately or Police Dispatch at (847) 459-2632. Water main breaks often occur due to subsurface ground shifting caused by cold, dry or wet weather. Public Works is responsible for all public water main repairs and the location of other nearby utility pipes such as gas, electrical and telephone. Sometimes water pipe breaks occur on private water service line and the property owner is responsible for the repair. Water main repairs often require notification to residents and businesses of temporary water service disruption. Notice of disruption can be immediate or indicate a future date and time of water shut-off. Public Works makes every effort to provide adequate prior to a water shut-off and resumption of service as soon as possible after a repair. After a pipe is repaired, cleaned and chlorinated, the excavated area is filled with dirt and/or gravel, and restored with grass or sidewalk at a later date.

Water Restrictions


The Village of Wheeling has an even-odd address exterior watering restriction in effect May 15 through September 15. Residents with street addresses that end with an even number (0, 2, 4, 6, and 8) can only water on even-numbered calendar days. Residents with street addresses that end with an odd number
(1, 3, 5, 7, and 9) can only water on odd-numbered calendar days. watering is prohibited for all properties from 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. every day. Contact the Community Development department with any
questions at (847) 459-2620.

Water Quality Report


The federal Safe Drinking Water Act requires the Village to provide residents and businesses with information on the Village’s water supply. Please click here to view the Village’s Water Quality Report.

For information on standing water, storm water pollution, drinking water, and freezing pipes, please
visit Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).
Water Tower
Public Works employees working on a storm sewer